A Manifestation of Ancient-Future at an Ordination

Last week I had the blessing to be in Tulsa, Oklahoma to participate in the consecration (or ordination) service for the newest bishop for my denomination.  The service was very beautiful and one I won’t forget.  Even as I sit and write this a week later I can still sense the ripples of what I experienced that evening.  I want to try to paint a picture of it for you…Read More »

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Liturgical Theology: The Church as Worshiping Community

As I have mentioned before, this website serves the purpose of equipping and empowering worsFreska u kaloti krstionice, manastir Žièa, Srbijahip leaders, theologically and in praxis. Often I attempt to synthesize theology and praxis (such as I did here) in a single article. Sometimes, however, the focus is on theology or praxis. In the case of theology, my desire is to introduce worship leaders to some of the best, modern scholarship on worship and liturgy. Today I offer another book review for this purpose.Read More »

Understanding Liturgy, Pt. I: An Evangelical Understanding

CommonWorshipBooksThanks to the work of evangelical scholars, particularly Robert E. Webber, there has been a renewed interest in evangelical circles on the history of our faith. The rise in interest in our Christian history has primarily peaked concerning the historic Church’s worship. In this pursuit, “liturgy” has made an appearance within North American evangelicalism

Plenty of scholarship outlines the origination of the word “liturgy”, or leitourgia, so I will not spend time describing its entrance into the Church. Often understood as “the work of the people”, some scholars offer an extended definition, that liturgy is primarily “the work of Christ”, as well as “the work of the people”. The latter definition offsets the tendency to see the liturgy as a good work performed by the Church.Read More »

“Ancient-Future Worship”

I remember writing book reports growing up and I always thought that it was a peculiar practice. What value was there in regurgitating what the author said? Now a little bit wiser I can assure there is some value to this practice, as it ensures (or not) that you understand the author’s purpose for writing the book and the thesis therein. It also gives the one writing the review an opportunity to affirm or critique the author.

174px-Zoso_John_Paul_Jones_sigil_interlaced_triquetra_overlaying_circle.svgThis is my first book review here on TalkingWorship.com and it will come from arguably the most influential book on my worship ministry. Influential in that it was the first book I read that truly explored what worship is and how it is enacted and in that it has provided avenues to other authors and books to read in my pursuit of worship and liturgical studies.

Here is Baker Publishing Group’s summary of the book:

“God has a story. Worship does God’s story.Read More »